Workers’ Compensation FAQs



A. First, get immediate medical attention. Depending on how bad the accident is, you should go to a doctor, clinic or emergency room right away. If you are badly hurt, have someone call an ambulance.



A. If you are injured at work, you are probably entitled to workers’ compensation benefits. You must report the accident to your supervisor, as soon as possible, and request that an accident report be completed. Remember to seek immediate medical attention for your injury. If the injury is serious and you are unable to immediately notify your supervisor, you may still seek workers’ compensation benefits, in most cases. It is also helpful to contact an attorney in your area for legal help with your claim.

Under New York State Law, all essential medical care must be paid for by your employer or their insurance company. Once you have received medical attention, you should file a claim for workers’ compensation benefits with the New York State Workers’ Compensation Board. You do this by filing the required form, called a “Form C-3 Employee’s Claim for Compensation Benefits.” This C-3 form can be obtained from your local Workers’ Compensation Board office, from the Board’s website or by calling our personal injury law offices. If you retain a White Plains workers’ compensation lawyer at our offices, we will help you complete the C-3 form and file it with the Workers’ Compensation Board on your behalf.



A. You will be entitled to have all of your accident-related medical bills paid by your employer’s insurance carrier. You are also entitled to a wage replacement benefit which is 2/3 of your “average weekly wage” up to the maximum weekly benefit.



A. The maximum weekly benefit you can obtain is 2/3 of your average weekly wage tax-free, up to a maximum of $400 per week for those employees who were injured or disabled prior to July 1, 2007. After July 1, 2007, the state has increased the benefits as follows:

• Up to $500 a week for an accident or disablement that occurs on or after July 1, 2007
• Up to $550 a week for an accident or disablement that occurs on or after July 1, 2008
• Up to $600 a week for an accident or disablement that occurs on or after July 1, 2009
• Up to $739.85 a week for an accident or disablement that occurs on or after July 1, 2010
• Up to $772.96 a week for an accident or disablement that occurs on after July 1, 2011
• Up to $792.07 a week for an accident or disablement that occurs on after July 1, 2012
• Up to $803.21 a week for an accident or disablement that occurs on after after July 1, 2013
• Up to $808.65 a week for an accident or disablement that occurs on after July 1, 2014




A. It is a monetary award that may be made to a worker who has injured an extremity and has been determined by a physician to have reached maximum medical improvement. The physician will then determine whether the injured worker has limited use of their extremity and then assign a percentage of limitation. The higher your percentage of limitation, the more money you are likely to receive.



A. In this case, you may be entitled to an award for either a “Permanent Partial Disability” (PPD) or a “Permanent Total Disability” (PTD.) This occurs when an injured worker undergoes months or years of failed medical treatment and is unable to recover from their injury.

A Permanent Partial Disability is an award determined when a treating physician determines that an injured worker is permanently disabled from their job but not totally disabled from working any job. A Permanent Partial Disability entitles the injured worker from receiving weekly benefits for a fixed time period. A Permanent Total Disability occurs when a physician determines that an injured worker is disabled from working any job and entitles the injured worker to weekly benefits for the rest of their life. The higher the level of disability, the more money you are likely to receive.


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